Prologue



Prologue


* * *

Disappointed that Yssantis had interrupted the conversation just when it seemed to be getting particularly interesting, Konstantin tried prompting him to continue the story: “Surely they must’ve had to give the Guardians more knowledge than just how to make fire, if they were to carry out these assignments, right?”
“Indeed. Although actually, humans taught themselves how to use fire 2.5 million years ago.” Yssantis hadn’t looked up from his book as he’d answered. “But yes, the Angels create a portal system for the Guardians on each planet, with concealed access points in lots of different places. It`s called Agartha.”
“Agartha? I know that name – how is that possible?” Konstantin couldn’t contain his curiosity any longer.
“Have you never asked yourself how it can be that certain names and events come up in the Bible and in other ancient texts that humans couldn’t possibly know about? You should’ve asked yourself that question when I mentioned Samael.”
“I assume the Angels had contact with other civilizations on Earth and these writings evolved from that over the course of time?” Konstantin mused.
“Partly right, but actually the fact that these ancient texts were distributed throughout the world had more to do with the downfall of the old civilization of Atlantis, in Greece.”
“The stories about Atlantis are true then? Where was the city?” The excitement in Konstantin’s voice was palpable.
“You’ll be surprised to hear that it wasn’t that far from here, in the Aegean Sea.” Yssantis gestured towards the southwest with his hand.
Konstantin grinned again at the thought of all the possible treasures awaiting him. “Right in front of our noses all these years … It’s high time we made a submarine seaworthy again.”
“Don’t bother - you won’t find anything there today. The city was originally above ground like any other, by the way. But let’s not get sidetracked by minor matters. As I was saying, the Angels establish the Agartha network on each planet. At the center of Agartha is a city, and in this city it’s possible to exist completely concealed from the outside world. Humans wrongly assumed that the city was in Tibet and gave it the name ‘Shangri-La’ after a mountain pass in Central Tibet.”
“Shangri-La … so many explorers and adventurers have searched for that legend.”
“Pointless,” said Yssantis as he turned his book around and pushed it across the table so that Konstantin could read it. It was opened at a page containing a sketch. It depicted an object that resembled a large gemstone. Its surface consisted of multiple asymmetrically positioned facets, the contours of which were, however, very sharp and exact. Just looking at the sketch gave Konstantin the feeling that a pulsating energy was emanating from its inner core and taking hold of his mind.
Yssantis started talking again, jolting Konstantin out of the gemstone’s thrall. “Agartha can only be accessed with a relic from the Angels. One solitary light prism that was given to the Guardians.”
Konstantin had collected his thoughts again. “So the secret society of the Guardians lives in Shangri-La?”
“No, not at all,” answered Yssantis. “The Guardians aren’t supposed to abandon their own civilization. They have a city here on Earth too. It was hidden from the rest of the human population with the help of the Angels’ technology.” Yssantis raised his head slightly and gave Konstantin a mysterious look out the corner of his eye. “Maybe I’ll take you there some day.”
Konstantin smiled faintly. He knew that Yssantis rarely made jokes and this suggestion was thus meant seriously, but he wasn’t particularly eager to meet a people that was in close contact with his most recent enemy. “Why don’t the Guardians live in Agartha permanently and just leave it when they have to?” he asked instead.
“Why do you have guards patrolling the streets of your city rather than putting them all in one room with hundreds of screens to monitor everything?” rejoined Yssantis, remembering the guardsmen that were more interested in a barrel of beer than the lampposts lying on the ground. “Even though your city guard could probably benefit from more discipline, it still fulfills its purpose. It’s important to show your presence in world affairs. It’s true that you don’t age as long as you are in Agartha, but there’s little point in whiling away your days in exile. Time inside Agartha passes at the same speed as outside.”
“Why were the Guardians entrusted with only one key?”
“A single artifact is easier to protect than many - it’s regarded as a divine treasure. No one but the Guardians are allowed to have access to the Power Stone. The Guardians also have to be able to control who uses Agartha and for what purpose. As I mentioned before, this system introduced by the gods was still very new - in fact, the Lhon’Dar still haven’t been able to find out everything about it. I would happily let you take the lead if you would be willing to personally research the rest,” Yssantis proclaimed. “I’ll tell you now, though, that the Guardians will always be able to locate this stone if it ever goes missing.”
Konstantin ignored this last remark. “Would I ever have heard of this light prism before?”
“That depends. The Guardians on Earth just called it the ‘Power Stone.’ But you may have actually heard of it because it was in Napoleon’s possession for a while.”
“Napoleon? How did he get hold of the stone?”
“Relatively easily, in his case. Much more interesting is the story of how the Guardians lost the stone in the first place, but we will have many opportunities to discuss these old stories when I next come to your city in search of somewhere to stay.”
“You are always welcome here, dear Yssantis - you know that. But the Guardians … were they given weapons as well?” They had finally got to the point in the story that interested Konstantin the most.
“Weapons are necessary in case other civilizations on the planet rebel. The Guardians were given the technology they needed, but if you’re expecting overpowered weaponry, I’m afraid I have to disappoint you. The Angels wouldn’t trust the Guardians with any weapons that could pose a threat to the Angels or the gods. But they were perfectly adequate for the rest of the population.”
Konstantin listened to Yssantis’s words intently. The possibility of extraterrestrial weaponry made the offer of visiting the mysterious city of the Guardians seem much less intimidating. “So who were the Guardians here on Earth?”
“When the Angels came to Earth 3,500 years before Christ to choose whom to appoint as Guardians, there were two highly developed civilizations: Atlantis and Icnun. They initially gave the technologies to both of them, as a sort of test. The Angels monitored their progress through frequent visits as the method was, of course, still very new only, having been introduced during the harvesting reform. They had enhanced human development before that, too, by passing on knowledge of irrigation techniques and agriculture, as well as rudimentary information about architecture and engineering. Technology accelerates the development of a planet and produces a larger population more quickly. In 3,114 before Christ, the Icnun were finally named the victors of the selections process.”
Slowly but surely, Konstantin began to grasp the interconnections and tried to piece it all together: “Earlier you mentioned messengers that were sent to the planets by the Angels to unite the civilizations. There were many prophets on Earth - I guess the Angels weren’t responsible for everything. Much is explained in human mythology itself. Could you tell me who the Angels sent to Earth in this role?”
“It’s moments like this that remind me that your astuteness is the reason why you were able to build all of this here … and is why I decided you were the person with whom I wanted to share my knowledge, Konstantin. Humans call this prophet Jesus. His mission on Earth was not particularly successful, though. And, by the way, neither was the Guardians’.”
“Whether his mission was successful or not hardly matters anymore, I’d say,” remarked Konstantin indignantly. “The vast majority of the human population was still taken … sucked up by that Harvesting Sphere in Earth’s orbit.”
“‘Raptured’ is the word you’re looking for,” replied Yssantis, without letting himself be affected by his friend’s emotions. “At least you humans have documented this word in your mythology. And, besides, you took out an Angel. Be happy that your civilization is used to fighting. And, of course, you must have profited personally.”
Konstantin calmed down as Yssantis’s words sank in.
“Indeed, the irony of the human race,” he joked, cheerful again.
They both stopped talking when the heavy velvet curtain at the entrance door was pushed to one side and two figures entered the otherwise empty bar. Mara scurried out of the backroom, where she had been changing the beer barrel.
The two newcomers crossed the room and sat down at the bar. On their backs they each carried long firearms which were held in place by invisible fastenings and which hung down below the bar stools. Their armor shimmered in a grayish-blue, and a pale orange glow emanated from in-built energy supply chambers on their backs and forearms. As they removed their helmets, with obvious relief, Mara brought them two freshly poured beers.
Konstantin noticed Yssantis’s watchful look. “Don’t worry, there’re a few soldiers from the New World Order here but they’ll be leaving again tomorrow. They actually helped us defend the city. But tell me, where are the Lhon’Dar now? And you haven’t told me what they look like yet!”
“I think we’d better end our conversation here for today, my dear Konstantin. You must, however, have heard in your youth of a very unusual asteroid called Oumuamua. That’s how the first Lhon’Dar contingent came to Earth and Nibiru while their mother ship remained just outside the asteroid belt. The reason for their visit was the signal giving the go ahead for the harvest, a signal that the Guardians had transmitted in 2012 and that the Lhon’Dar listened in to.”
Yssantis leafed through his book one last time, removed a few pages, and placed them in front of Konstantin. “I’ve picked out a few more of my notes for you. Read them when you have time. And thank you kindly for your unfailingly excellent hospitality.”
With these words, Yssantis stood up from the table and made his way across the room towards the stairs that led to the upper floors, where a bedroom was always kept ready for him.
Konstantin was so captivated by the illustration on the piece of paper in front of him that he said nothing as his friend left. The picture of a demonic figure had stunned him into silence.

To be continued...